Canaan - _The Unsaid Words_
(Aural Music / Eibon Records, 2006)
by: Pedro Azevedo (6 out of 10)
Italy's Canaan are one of those bands I have been aware of for a number of years, yet never really discovered. It was therefore with some degree of curiosity that I delved into _The Unsaid Words_, a lengthy and apparently ambitious effort by this latest incarnation of the band. Unsurprisingly, the material on offer consistently takes its time to unwind and develop, requiring sufficient dedication on the part of the listener in order to have a chance to work. Canaan's sound is essentially built from synth and male singing (occasionally in Italian), bass lines and occasional electric guitar, with only the necessary percussion to carry the compositions. In between tracks, Canaan explore more ambient based paths, also utilising acoustic string instruments and choirs. The main compositions, so to speak, are very laid back, tranquil pieces that generally have a conspicuous absence of any real peaks; indeed my main criticism is that Canaan's apparent reluctance to lead their compositions towards some kind of climax tends to render them rather sterile for the most part. The music is still certainly pleasant on a more atmospheric level, as ensured by its melancholy and subtlety, and it is hard to criticise a band for something that is clearly a songwriting option rather than a shortcoming per se. Still, _The Unsaid Words_ turns out to be an album that I won't be spinning much in the future for sure, as for all its qualities it simply fails to really capture my attention for much of its considerable duration.

Contact: http://www.eibonrecords.com

(article published 27/2/2006)


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